System That Creates Audited Blockchain Checkpoints Gets Patented By IBM

System That Creates Audited Blockchain Checkpoints Gets Patented By IBM

Blockchain Security
June 1, 2018 by Francisco Caldas
167
IBM has successfully been granted two patents for a system that has the capability of authenticating a specific blockchain’s integrity, assuring that it has passed certain mandatory benchmark fundamentals at particular spans of time. The two patents were approved yesterday, May 31, and are related to each other in the way that they describe certified,
ibm

IBM has successfully been granted two patents for a system that has the capability of authenticating a specific blockchain’s integrity, assuring that it has passed certain mandatory benchmark fundamentals at particular spans of time.

The two patents were approved yesterday, May 31, and are related to each other in the way that they describe certified, audit-able “checkpoints.” The main goal of the checkpoints is to allow businesses to satisfy regulations for data verification and retention when connecting to the network.

The first patent elaborates on the single point of a checkpoint and what it constitutes, according to IBM. The checkpoint’s requirement is that the consensus about the validity of the blockchain at the time of the snapshot is achieved by all nodes.

A summary of the patent says:

  • “Before a checkpoint is certified, it must be consistent, meaning that all validating peers must reach the same state (value) for the checkpoint. Preferably, the checkpoint is a compression of the current blockchain world state into a compact representation (e.g., a hash value) of the ledger that is consistent across the (validating) peers.”

The objective is for the audit to go all the way back to the Genesis block and proceed from there. This is the course of action so as to ensure that the immutability and consensus remained intact until the period it is being certified.

The second patent expands the first one but also describes how the checkpoints are audited.

A summary of the second patent reads:

  • “To have a certifiably-auditable blockchain, an auditor should be able to rerun the transactions between checkpoints and then compare the value of the latter checkpoint with the value recorded in the ledger. The first step in this auditing process is to double check the hashes of all the blocks in the chain. To be thorough, the signatures on all transactions should be checked, although the hashes on all blocks ought to be sufficient.”

This is yet another move by IBM to engage with blockchain technology after having recently tested solutions utilizing Stellar’s blockchain.

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